Halpern’s centers set themselves apart with a Halloween tradition

As part of a longstanding tradition that shows our commitment to giving back to the communities we serve, Halpern is again treating shopping center shoppers with candy this Halloween.

For 12 years, Halpern has purchased Halloween treats for trick-or-treating in three of its Georgia shopping centers: Old Orchard Square in Ellijay, North Griffin Square in Griffin, and Newton Plaza in Covington.

This ties into the need to do interesting things at shopping centers for the holidays, both to entice potential visitors and to keep centers relevant and at the forefront with regular customers.

“We like to plan unique events and holiday traditions at our shopping centers,” said Carolyn Oppenheimer, Executive Vice President at Halpern. “These types of traditions not only attract visitors and create a positive experience for shoppers, but also help increase customer traffic to our tenants. These events help to solidify our reputation as a committed, caring partner in the communities where we do business.”

In Atlanta, restaurants drive retail traffic more than ever

The tenant mix of Atlanta’s shopping centers is leaning more and more towards chef-driven and fast-casual restaurants, said participants at a recent Atlanta Retail Roundtable hosted by Shopping Center Business magazine.

Halpern's president, Bill Brown, participated in the Atlanta Retail Roundtable hosted by Shopping Center Business.

Halpern’s president, Bill Brown, participated in the Atlanta Retail Roundtable hosted by Shopping Center Business.

Bill Brown, president of Halpern Enterprises, participated on the panel along with more than 25 other retail real estate professionals in the Atlanta area. Comments from the roundtable were featured in the October issue of Shopping Center Business.

With more than 85 chef-driven restaurants planned in Atlanta, “restaurants are the new department stores,” said Michael Habif of Habif Properties.

In Halpern’s case, its new Smyrna center, The Shops at Belmont, will feature several restaurants including Creatwood Tavern, the latest dining concept by the owners of Whitehall Tavern, and Cielo Mexican Restaurant.

Besides seeking the ever-popular restaurants, Brown explained that grocery-anchored centers have shifted focus from soft good retailers (such as clothing stores) to service-related tenants (such as nail salons), due to changes in consumer demand.

Growth on MARTA’s Gold Line will revitalize Doraville area

All along MARTA’s Gold Line, which runs northeast from Atlanta’s downtown and Midtown areas, transit-oriented development is taking root.

New developments are planned near MARTA stations in Brookhaven and Chamblee, and in Doraville, the massive former General Motors auto plant has been torn down to make way for a film studio and a major mixed-use development.

Jack Halpern, Chairman of Halpern Enterprises, is also chairman of the Doraville Downtown Development Authority.

The GM site redevelopment, he told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, will be a “game changer” for Doraville because it is expected to bring thousands of new residents and workers to the city. “Our company owns about 300,000 feet of retail and wholesale space in the Doraville market and we are excited about the potential growth and redevelopment coming to our area.”

To read the full story at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, click here. (Note: A subscription is required to see the entire story.)

 

Three retailers commit to Dawson Crossroads as interest in the Dawsonville center grows

Partial rendering of Dawson Crossroads, Dawsonville, GA

Partial rendering of Dawson Crossroads, Dawsonville, GA

Leasing activity has picked up and is going strong at Halpern Enterprises’ new Dawson Crossroads center.  Several retailers and restaurants have signed leases in the 29-acre Dawsonville development, which is expected to open in 2016.

Brooklyn Joe’s Pizzeria, Lee Nails, and Great Clips are the first tenants to commit to go inline at the center, which will be anchored by a major national grocery store.  There is space available for a junior anchor and an assortment of other shops and restaurants. Chili’s restaurant is coming to the corner outparcel, and there is also a high level of interest in the property’s other outparcels from popular franchises.

“Dawsonville is becoming a shopping hub for the entire surrounding area, and Dawson Crossroads will be right in the middle of that activity,” said Dan Gagne, Regional Director of Leasing for Halpern. “With excellent highway access and a prime location, the center will be a good fit for tenants looking for a high traffic area.”

The area already features the North Georgia Premium Outlets, a regional draw for high-end, off-price retailers as well as Walmart and Home Depot.  Dawsonville is rapidly becoming a bedroom community for Atlanta, within easy reach of northern suburbs like Alpharetta and Cumming.

Site work for Dawson Crossroads is expected to start in August, with the first shops to be ready for tenants next summer.

For more information about leasing opportunities at Dawson Crossroads, contact Dan Gagne at dgagne@halpernent.com or (770) 508-3322, John Brozovic at jbrozovic@halpernent.com or (770) 508-3314, or Benjamin Halpern at bhalpern@halpernent.com or (770) 508-3325.

Two new tenants coming to The Shops at Belmont

Two more retail tenants have signed leases at Halpern’s Belmont development in the Atlanta suburb of Smyrna:

  • Cielo Mexican Grill & Cantina, a popular Atlanta-area Mexican restaurant, has leased a 4,000-square-foot space. This will be the second location for the Cielo concept. The company also runs La Bamba Mexican Bar & Grill, a chain of seven Atlanta-area Mexican restaurants.
  • Parisian Nails and Spa will open its third location at Belmont, a 3,500-square-foot day spa offering manicures, pedicures, massages, waxing services and laser hair removal procedures.

The new tenants join Whitehall Tavern as announced tenants for the new retail center, which is set to open its first phase later this year.

For more information about The Shops at Belmont, visit www.shopsatbelmont.com.

 

Having solid local relationships pays off when issues come up

An example of working closely with a municipality is shown here, as Halpern property manager Brad Oppenheimer (second from left) was in a group of Covington, Ga. and state officials that discussed creating a Community Improvement District in Covington. Others in the photo, left to right: Covington utilities director Tim Morris, Georgia Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle, Covington business owner Scott Knight; Covington city manager Lee Anne Knight; State Sen. Ronald Ramsey Sr., and Covington city councilwoman Hawnethia Williams.

An example of working closely with a municipality is shown here, as Halpern property manager Brad Oppenheimer (second from left) was in a group of Covington, Ga. and state officials that discussed creating a Community Improvement District in Covington. Others in the photo, left to right: Covington utilities director Tim Morris, Georgia Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle, Covington business owner Scott Knight; Covington city manager Lee Anne Knight; State Sen. Ronald Ramsey Sr., and Covington city councilwoman Hawnethia Williams.

Developing and operating shopping centers often requires working closely with local municipalities. Halpern Enterprises finds that investing in property must extend further than the real estate – it also requires investing time into establishing relationships in surrounding communities.

“We often face challenges when we are helping tenants open a new business and have found that strong personal relationships with professionals within the local government may help facilitate the process,” said Brad Oppenheimer, a Halpern property manager.

This comes into play both in larger cities and in smaller towns where Halpern owns and operates retail centers. In smaller towns, meeting the key people can be a bit simpler, of course.

“In a town like Covington, Georgia, where the government employees and Chamber of Commerce staff are welcoming and extremely helpful, making connections may be much easier than in cities with larger and more complicated networks like, for instance, the City of Atlanta,” he said.

For developers and managers looking to grow their network, Oppenheimer suggests getting to know one official who can then introduce you to colleagues. The key is to form the relationship before an issue comes up. You don’t want the first call to an official to be one where you need help right away.

“We see this approach work well in towns like Doraville, where we can quickly receive feedback, then deliver quick answers to our tenants,” Oppenheimer said. “And that makes a remarkable difference in keeping tenants happy.”